AndFarAway

A Blog from Amman, Jordan, Online Since 2004.

Month: November 2012 (Page 1 of 4)

Girl Met World Already

My all-time favorite show is COMING BACK. With Cory and Topanga! Raising up their teenage DAUGHTER! Wow. My life is now complete.

It’s hard to explain the affinity I feel towards Boy Meets World to people who didn’t grow up with the show. It aired on the Disney Channel for eight years (1993-2000), and reruns continued even after the show was done. For us 90’s kids, Boy Meets World coincided with our most formative decade; I was eight years old when the show started, and 15 when it ended. Cory and Topanga were always four years older than me; they had the lives, relationships, and friendships I wanted to have when “I grew up”.

When I close my eyes and think of BMW, I see my brothers and I sprawled in our old living room in Riyadh, watching back-to-back reruns on Friday, and eating Pizza Inn. “cory & topanga 4 ever” was scribbled in my friend’s binder when we were in seventh grade. I would think about Mr. Feeney’s advice and what it meant before I went to sleep. I had the world’s biggest crush on Shawn (today’s wiser and smarter 27-year-old me congratulates kid me on such good taste in men; Rider Strong is still gorgeous).

A couple of years back, I went through this phase where I re-watched all seven seasons of BMW again, ten years later, as an adult. I watched them through the eyes of a woman who has been through death, lost love, college, the financial crisis, broken friendships, years of office jobs, and all other kinds of “real” experiences. I bought a box set from Hammoudeh for 10JDs and felt bad about spending so much money on a TV show. I expected myself to find it cheesy, stupid, and disgraceful to my childhood.

But I didn’t. I sat outside on the balcony every night for several months, watching the episodes on my iPad as I smoked cigarettes and laughed and cried and reminisced and tweeted and repeated and googled and thought and dreamed. Boy Meets World, I realized then, is a show that was created with love.

I know a spin-off today is not going to manage to wrench my heart like the BMW of my childhood did.  After all, I consciously didn’t choose the life Cory and Topanga chose after the show ended; children, a white picket fence, homework assignments, blah blah blah. I chose a life that revolves around happy hour, and an intense dislike of the idea of procreation.

But whether or not our lives took separate turns in the past decade after the show ended, I can’t wait to watch Girl Meets World. Will the kids of today — with their video games, Internet, and YouTube — like it?  Will it work outside the simplicity of the 90’s, when life was about rollerblades, bicycles, and the Power Rangers? Probably not. But for those of us born in the 80’s, it will be a bittersweet reminder that yesterday has passed. Somehow.

I got something “restricted”

I somehow ordered something “restricted” in Jordan from Amazon. I feel so “cool” and “illegal”.

Aramex

I’m not sure exactly what it is, because I ordered several things, but possible items:
– Pinhole camera
– Chinese calligraphy set
Toy music maker
Galaxy tights

I am SO “dangerous”.

In all cases, boooooooooo.

Amman Rhythm

.أول. تاني. تالت. رابع. خامس. سادس. سابع. تامن

لشو التغير – شربل روحانا

لشو التغيير

يللي عم تاكل عم تشرب
و بأي مطعم كنت
مندقلك منغنيلك ومنسهر نحنا وانت
هني الأكلات ذاتن والغنيات ذاتن
حتى السميعة ذاتن
لشو التغيير

يللي عم تكدح يومية وبأي شغلة كنت
كنو فكرك انو بكرى بيحمينا نحنا وانت
هني الأوادم ذاتن ….ما بيحميهن غير ذاتن
بيضلوا هني ذاتن
لشو التغيير

يللي عم تطمح عالفاضي ومن أي ديانة كنت
المستقبل متل الماضي والحاضر هوي انت
هني الطوايف ذاتن وبيجتمعوا مع ذاتن
حتى يختاروا ذاتن
لشو التغيير

يللي عم تنطر بالفي وتحت العريشة كنت
شي علاقة رومانسية مع أحلى وأجمل بنت
هني البدايات ذاتن والنهايات ذاتن
حتى لو منن ذاتن
لشو التغيير

يللي عم تحلم ليلية وباي فرشة كنت
بشي صبية هيفاوية لاتنسى وينك انت
هني الصبايا ذاتن حتى البوسات ذاتن
وبما انو هني ذاتن
لشو التغيير

يللي عم تحصر أفكارك على أي محطة كنت
مهما تحصر مهما تحلل رح تبقى حيث انت
هني اللي بيحكوا ذاتن … وما بيسمعوا غير ذاتن
خدهن على علاتن
لشو التغيير

يللي عم تسعى للهجرة وعلى أي دولة كنت
مهما تسعى أنا بالعشرة… ببصملك وين ما نزلت
هني البلدان ذاتن شمالاً وجنوباً ذاتن
شرقاً وغرباً ذاتن
لشو التتغير

يللي عم تسمع بالوقفة ومفكر في شي جديد
طمن بالك هيي هيي ولا نوطة فيك تزيد
هني الأفكار ذاتن والألحان ذاتن
حتى الموسيقي ذاتن
لشو التغيير

هني الأفكار ذاتن و الالحان ذاتن
حتى القفلات ذاتن
لشو التغيير

آخر فكرة لولادي وايضاً لولاد الناس
يللي حلمن عم يزهر .. حلمن عالعين والراس
بلكي التغيير جايي … على حظن هني جايي… رغماً عن حزني جايي انشالله التغيير
بلكي التغيير جاي … على ايدن هني …. كرمال عيونن جايي انشالله التغيير
بلكي التغيير جايي … على وجهن هني جايي … ولومهما طال جايي انشاالله التغيير

Read more: http://www.christian-guys.net/vb/showthread.php?64221-لشو-التغيير-شربل-روحانا&s=ecb3424ab1fdd96c580362a510d063b8#ixzz2CkYCKPQp

Pictures of People in Lebanon from the Middle of the Last Century

I’m not sure how I came across these photographs on Tate’s website, but I am totally captivated. I’ve seen lots of family pictures set in the Arab world from early- and mid- 20th century, but none of them had as much character as this set.

Although they’re mostly shot in studios, there’s an absurd sense of realness in them, in the same way that Napoleon Dynamite is more real most other highschool dramas. Their awkwardness, joy, and absurdity is a fantastic snippet into our past.

A simpler past.


Ahmad el Abed, and his friend Rajab Arna’out. Madani’s parents’ home, the studio, Saida, Lebanon, 1948-53. 
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Students and teachers of Aisha Om el Mo’minin School for Girls. Wadiah Lofty (right) and a school teacher colleague. School courtyard, Saida, Lebanon, 1948-49.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Abu Jalal Dimassy (centre) and two of his friends acting out a hold-up. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


A fisherman with his daughters. Saqqa family house, Saida, Lebanon, 1948-53. 
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Tarho and El Masri. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1958. “Films inspired people a lot. They came to perform kissing in front of a camera. In a conservative society such as Saida, people were willing to play the kiss between two people of the same sex, but very rarely between a man and a woman. I remember only one couple who came to the studio and kissed in front of the camera, and they were not married. The rest of them were people of the same sex. One of them plays the woman, while the other plays the man.”
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Amin Hijazi (left) and his cousin Gharamti. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1950s-1960s  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Akram ZaatariAnonymous. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, early 1960s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Anonymous. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1970s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Anonymous. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1970s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Syrian resistants. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, early 1970s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Ahmad el Abed’s sister. Madani’s parents’ home, the studio, Saida, Lebanon, 1948-53.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Najm (left) and Asmar (right). Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1950s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Palestinian with his guitar. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, early 1970s.
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Palestinian resistant. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1968-72.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Twins. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1950s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Syrian resistant. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, early 1970s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Syrian resistant. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, early 1970s.
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Anonymous. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1950s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Anonymous. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1960.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Two young men from Aadloun. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1966.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Abu Zahr and his wife. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, 1973-74.
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut


Bashasha (left) and a friend. Studio Shehrazade, Saida, Lebanon, late 1950s.  
©Akram Zaatari, courtesy Hashem el Madani and Arab Image Foundation, Beirut

This is the best old footage I’ve seen of a Led Zeppelin performance, and I love Led Zeppelin, though this is my least favorite of their songs. Robert Plant = Amazingness.

The Little Match Girl Cartoon

Although my nerves and heart are made of steal, I have one weakness: Japanese anime.

It’s a little sadistic that we watched such heart-wrenching cartoons as children.

Think Big by Rula Al-Assi

Long but fantastic, this is a recording of a talk my mother gave this year about thinking big. It’s in Arabic.

How They Make Food Look So Good in Commercials

This is a short and beautiful video that explains how advertisers and brands make their products look so appealing in video. The secret: high-speed cameras. They record fast-moving objects as photo frames after which the images can be played back in slow-motion.

Amazing, right?

For those wondering further about how a high-speed camera can capture so many damn frames, here’s the explanation from Wikipedia:

A normal motion picture is filmed and played back at 24 frames per second, while television uses 25 frames/s (PAL) or 29.97 frames/s (NTSC). High-speed cameras can film up to a quarter of a million frames per second by running the film over a rotating prism or mirror instead of using a shutter, thus reducing the need for stopping and starting the film behind a shutter which would tear the film stock at such speeds.

Woof. My brain is blown. More interestingness in how processing power in saving and reading is keeping camera technology back:

Saving the recorded high-speed images can be time consuming because the newest cameras today have resolutions up to four megapixels at record rates over 1000 frames per second, which means in one second you will have over 11 gigabytes of image data. Technologically these cameras are very advanced, yet saving images requires use of slower standard video-computer interfaces. While recording is very fast, saving images is considerably slower. The fastest high-speed camera has the ability to take pictures at a speed of 200 million frames per second.

Bikaffi Tghallo feat. Gotye – Jordanian Style

Haha, this is funny.

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